Mark 6b Notes

Mark6b (vs14-29)                                     Notes

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  

14 King Herod heard of it, for Jesus' name had become   known.

  
  

Enter politics. Why? The Lord's blossoming work &   reputation.           Note1

  
  

Some said, "John the Baptist has been raised from the   dead.

  
  

Various opinions: sad the variety of views that can be   taken on the same facts.

  
  

That is why these miraculous powers are at work in Him."

  
  

Superstitious idea that risen man brings back power with   him.

  
  

15 But others said, "He is Elijah."

  
  

He was to come before the Messiah (Mal4:5)

  
  

And others said, "He is a prophet, like one of the   prophets of old."

  
  

The prophet Moses promised (Dt18:15) or another.

  
  

16 But when Herod heard of it, he said, "John, whom I   beheaded, has been raised."

  
  

This Herod was a haunted man. His misdeeds plagued him.   Mark's segue into this back-story...

  
  

17 For it was Herod who had sent and seized John

  
  

Government has a fearsome power to rule/ruin men's lives...

  
  

and bound him in prison for the sake of Herodias,

  
  

brings the ministry of the Voice to a close. "I must   decrease." Instigated by a woman.

  
  

his brother Philip's wife, because he had married her.

  
  

Divorce did not break her bond to 1st husband.   Nor did marriage properly join her to 2nd husband.

  
  

18 For John has been saying to Herod,

  
  

John's continual message for Herod -- directed at the man   in charge -- regularly:

  
  

"It is not lawful for you to have your brother Philip's   wife."

  
  

Against God's revealed will in the Law of Moses. The law   of man said otherwise. Note2

  
  

19 And Herodias held a grudge against him

  
  

The woman did not want her fun spoiled by a meddling   preacher.

  
  

and wanted to put him to death. But she could not

  
  

What power a grudge can have -- to destroy its object. Only   one obstacle:

  
  

20 for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous   and holy man,

  
  

her husband respected the preacher, recognizing holiness

  
  

and he kept him safe.

  
  

The ruler here protected the innocent -- as should always   be his duty.

  
  

When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed,

  
  

The typically confliction of loose living and trained   conscience.

  
  

and yet he heard him gladly.

  
  

Yet somehow mesmerized by good teaching, though torment to   hear.

  
  

21 But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave   a banquet

  
  

Lurking evil will eventually find a time to have its way.   Vanity to bathe in attention.

  
  

for his nobles and military commanders and leading men of Galilee.

  
  

Any excuse to through a party -- and favors at your   associates. Suspect motives.

  
  

22 For when Herodias' daughter came in and danced,

  
  

Men indulge in lewd pleasures to their own demise. Foolish   display of a stripper.

  
  

she pleased Herod and his guests.

  
  

Sensual gratification to lust after the beautiful form of   a young woman.

  
  

And the king said to the girl, "Whatever you ask me, I   will give you, up to half of my kingdom."

  
  

Causes the ruler to make rash promises. He must have been   truly out of his mind.

  
  

24 And she went out and said to her mother, "For what   should I ask?"

  
  

Such an opportunity for influence, advancement never more   wasted.

  
  

And she said, "The head of John the Baptist."

  
  

The vindictive woman doesn't hesitate to seize the moment   for vengeance.        Note3

  
  

25 And she came in immediately with haste to the king and   asked, saying,

  
  

The young lady (?) runs back to make her mother happy -- or   so she thinks.

  
  

"I want you to give me at once the head of John the   Baptist on a platter."

  
  

The girl embellished the awful request with a flourish - "on   a plate" - as tho to dress it.

  
  

26 And the king was exceedingly sorry,

  
  

Stabbed through the chink in his armor, he recoils from   the engagement,

  
  

but because of his oaths and his guests he did not want to   break his word to her.

  
  

but is pressed by pride and vainglory to honor his oath   before these witnesses.

  
  

27 And immediately the king sent an executioner with   orders to bring John's head.

  
  

How quickly the pivotal career comes to an end -- at the   stroke of hatred and steel.

  
  

He went and beheaded him in prison

  
  

John's one-way trip to Herod's prison. He did not leave in   one piece.

  
  

28 and brought his head on a platter and gave it to the   girl

  
  

The executioner presents as requested. Poor John's head passed   from one to another...

  
  

and the girl gave it to her mother.

  
  

OK Herodias, are you satisfied now? A most gruesome   present. How quickly the gift spoiled in her sight.                      Note4

  
  

29 When his disciples heard of it,

  
  

Such sad news to reach his followers. After years (2.5?)   of serving this great man.

  
  

they came and took his body and laid it in a tomb.

  
  

Interring his beheaded corpse their final homage to the   Messiah's Messenger. Note5

  

 

Note1: Historical Setting - Luke3:1 Technically, Herod not a King, but a Tetrarch or governor.

 

Note2: Herod was 'lawfully' married to Herodias, but not joined to her as God intended. Why? She was still bound to her first husband, Philip, whom she divorced. See Matt19.5&9 and Romans7.1-3. Herod also had divorced his 1stwife, a younger princess from the East, in order to marry Herodias.

 

Note3: "It never goes well when the hen crows. How many have we known, whose heads have been broken with their own rib?" (Trapp)

 

Note4: They had each other as their mutual reward: Herod and Herodias both banished to Gaul, where they committed suicide.

 

Note5: If this is what they do to the Announcer, what will they do to the King?

notes by David Teel Saturday, April 19, 2014




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