Mark 7b Notes

Mark7b (vs24-37)                                     Notes

 

                                                           
  

24 And from there He arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon.

  
  

Capernaum to Tyre is a walking trip   of 40 miles at least. This retreat taken deliberately out of Jewish   territory.            Note1

  
  

And He entered a house and did not want anyone to know,   yet He could not be hidden.

  
  

As He has directed apostles, He relied on hospitality.   Intent on some seclusion, but He is obvious anywhere.                     Note2

  
  

25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter was   possessed by an unclean spirit

  
  

A pressing need earnestly seeks a solution. We could ask,   "Why was this innocent little girl possessed with a demon?"

  
  

heard of Him and came and fell down at His feet.

  
  

Somehow the word got out, & she came, respectfully   bowing down.

  
  

26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth.

  
  

From unclean hands & food, Jesus now deals with   unclean people.                  Note3

  
  

And she begged Him to cast the demon out of her daughter.

  
  

Humble and determined to gain this specific relief. Strong   intercession.

  
  

27 And He said to her, "Let the children by fed first, for   it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs."

  
  

A testing proposition. My bread intended for my children.   You are a dog. I must do right by my responsibility.                  Note4

  
  

28 But she answered Hi, "Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs   under the table eat the children's crumbs."

  
  

Instead of protest or complaint, she submits and fits   herself into the figure! Ok, I'll take the crumbs.

  
  

29 And He said to her, "For this statement you may go your   way; the demon has left your daughter."

  
  

Jesus is glad to reward humility and faith. Relax. Right   now, your girl is free.

  
  

30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and   the demon gone.

  
  

Anticipation in the trip home. What joy to have her   daughter well again!

  

 

Note1: One student suggests He took the trade route to Acco on the coast, then up to Tyre and Sidon, making the entire one-way trip some 85 miles (godspointofview.com). It would then make sense to return by loop to Galilee via Decapolis. Additional Note: Another source estimates that Jesus walked 3,125 miles during His 3 years of work, with a life-time total of over 21,525 miles (shalomtoyou321@aol.com).

 

Note2: The closed heart cannot see God right in front of him. Anyone looking cannot miss the Lord; He stands out so obviously. He is marvelously evident!

 

Note3: The Lord is breaking the tradition of the orthodox Jew. Not washing as they did. Not keeping company with the holy ones. Even traveling in and staying in the homes of Gentiles!

 

Note4: "Dog" was often used in a derogatory sense. The base word could be translated 'hound.' They were not the domesticated pets of today -- 'man's best friend.' Some scripture use: A figure of speech for a harlot (Dt23.18). A dangerous wild animal (Psa22.20). Disrespected for dirty habits (2Pet2.22). See Paul's use -- a figure for false teachers (Phil3.2). Jesus did use the diminutive "little dogs" to soften the blow or refer to puppies that might be allowed in the house.

 

                                                                       
  

31 Then He returned from the region of Tyre   and went through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee,   in the region of the Decapolis.

  
  

Traveling around to enter Galilee   from the East. Extending the retreat by a circuitous route home. Away for at   least weeks.

  
  

32 And they brought to Him a man who was deaf and had a   speech impediment,

  
  

Others, caring for this man, supplement what he could not   learn or communicate.

  
  

and they begged Him to lay His hand on him.

  
  

Intercessory work again. Faith in the Lord's touch -- to   impart healing.

  
  

33 And taking him aside from the crowd privately,

  
  

Chooses a setting away, not from humility, but tactical   need to control excitement.

  
  

He put His fingers into his ears, and after spitting   touched his tongue.

  
  

Very personal and earthy contact, align with expectations   of people.               Note5

  
  

34 And looking up to heaven, He sighed and said to him,   "Ephphatha," that is, "Be opened."

  
  

His connection to realms above. His sympathetic grown.   Prayer for function of ears and tongue to be restored.           Note6

  
  

35 And his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and   he spoke plainly.

  
  

Figures: unplugged hearing and unchained mouth. Plus   comprehension & expression.

  
  

36 And Jesus charged them to tell no one.

  
  

His intent to keep knowledge of this healing limited. Did   He know what they would do?

  
  

But the more He charged them, the more zealously they   proclaimed it.

  
  

Seems here a summary: all His urging so far unheeded, even   working opposite.

  
  

37 And they were astonished beyond measure, saying,

  
  

Super-abundant amazement at Jesus fuels their   super-abundant publication.

  
  

"He has done all things well."

  
  

We examine His work -- and nothing is lacking. All He does   is excellent!

  
  

"He even makes the deaf hear and the mute speak."

  
  

These pitiful conditions not known to have cure. Men had   no medicine for these ailments. But, Jesus restores all ills.

  

 

 

Note5: Jesus not bound by any particular procedure or method of healing. Much variety in His miracles. Some have said, "He never healed the same way twice."

 

Note6: The word 'sigh' elsewhere rendered 'groan.' We groan under the burden of a sin-cursed life, awaiting future transformation (Rom8.23 / 2Cor5.2,4). Difficult followers make leaders' work miserable (Heb13.17). A judgmental attitude prompts us to complain about others (Jas5.9). The Spirit translates our wordless burdens in prayer (Rom8.26). Perhaps Jesus here feels loaded with the infirmities of this man (see Isa53.4).

 

notes by David Teel Saturday, May 17, 2014




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